5 Productivity Apps To Help You Get Things Done

We’ve all been there. You thought your husband was picking up from soccer camp. He thought it was your turn.  No one remembered grocery pick up and you aren’t sure when you’re up for snacks.

There is so. much. going. on. And lets get real–it only gets crazier when school starts back! Here are some great apps you can add to your phone to help keep yourself (and your family) on track.

Trello

Trello is awesome because its entirely what you make it–it can be a way to plan your family vacation with out of town guests, a place to store photos or make grocery lists. Think of it as the modern day kitchen cork board–snap a picture of the book sale flyer, generate your packing list, store your favorite sitter’s info. Then, take it with you!

Cozi

Cozi is more geared towards families with multiple users on the app. You can assign tasks and calendars so specific members of your family. That way, your teenage son doesn’t get the notification that you have an OB appointment but your husband knows so he can handle picking up the younger kids.

Grocery IQ

This genius apps lets you share grocery lists and has a barcode function that lets you scan in what you need before you toss the empty. Save yourself a trip for forgotten items and better yet–avoid ending up with two dozen strawberries because you and your husband both grabbed them.

Two Happy Homes

Working with two homes due to custody schedules? This app helps streamline the coordination of playdate, teacher conferences and sports schedule. You can share child-centric information here and not worry about giving access to your personal calendar to co-parents.

OurHome

Delegate! This app allows you to assign various chores and tasks to members of your family. You can follow up to see what has been completed or prove to your kids that you REALLY did ask them to move the laundry.

 

 

Why I Am Not Paying My Kid to Do Chores

Over breakfast, my eight year old daughter broached the subject of an allowance.

“Can I have five dollars every time I do the dishes?”

Go big or go home, am I right? While I respect a woman who reaches for the top of the salary charts, I still shut her down immediately.

Growing up, we had chores we were expected to do. My mom worked and there was typically an hour or two where my brother and I were alone after school. The reminder of what was expected of us was typically jotted on the back of an old envelope. “Jamie–empty the dishwasher, clean your room. Jeremy–take out the trash, fold laundry. NO TV UNTIL CHORES ARE DONE.” No one was there to check on us yet I am pretty sure that more often than not, the chores were done before we turned on the TV. It was just expected, so we did it. Young boy doing housework at home

I have the same expectation of my kids. My daughter is just reaching the age of being able to independently (and correctly) handle dish duty. I don’t make her do it every meal or even every day, but when I ask, I expect it to be done without a fight–and for free. Pitching in is the price you pay for being a part of a family that lives in a clean and orderly house. Quite the trade off, if you ask me.

I was so excited when our community manager in Raleigh, Abigail, shared this article with me about the concept. I was particularly drawn to this quote from Daniel Pink, author of The New York Times bestseller, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, about what paying kids for chores does:

“…sends kids a clear (and clearly wrongheaded) message: In the absence of a payment, no self-respecting child would willingly set the table, empty the garbage, or make her own bed. …. It converts a moral and familial obligation into just another commercial transaction—and teaches that the only reason to do a less-than-desirable task for your family is in exchange for payment.”

I want both of my girls to value a dollar but to also value what it means to contribute and what a healthy family dynamic looks like. I refuse to martyr myself over loads of laundry and piles of dishes. There are three capable humans here, so I shouldn’t be doing it all. More importantly, one day my daughter will likely be raising her own family and I don’t want to raise her with the expectation that she has to do it all–or even pay for her family to help her.

That doesn’t mean my kids won’t have a chance to earn money. We talk about basic things that keep our household running–laundry, vacuuming, dishes–as obligations that belong to us. It helps that my husband models this by pitching in regularly and owning specific tasks (hello, mowing the lawn).

But when my daughter wants to earn money for something? There are tasks that go above and beyond–dusting ceiling fans, cleaning golf clubs (you’re welcome husband), or   pulling weeds.

How do you handle chore distribution in your house? Do your kids get an allowance?